Billiards wasn’t always the easiest game to play during the days of our founding fathers – and we’re not talking about tough competition. Crude equipment, interesting uses for tables and more made it difficult at times to even play on a table. In fact….

  • Billiard tables weren’t just for billiards in those days. It wasn’t unusual to see a billiard table being used as a makeshift bed, dining table or even morgue. Try racking up around a sleeping houseguest!
  • Cue sticks were far from the streamlined pieces crafted from hearty woods like maple that they are today. Early American cues were rickety pieces – tapered poles of ash or other light-weight woods with nothing on the tip.
  • Sides were less than ideal. Picture cloth sleeves stuffed with cotton, feathers, saw dust or strips of felt.
  • Manufacturers weren’t all that picky about the wood they used, so tables often warped easily, rendering them useless or incredibly tricky to play.

Now who’s thankful for all of the wonderful innovations in the modern game of billiards? We know we are.